EDMs

Electrical discharge machining (EDM), also known as spark machining, spark eroding, burning, die sinking, wire burning or wire erosion, is a manufacturing process whereby a desired shape is obtained by using electrical discharges (sparks). Material is removed from the workpiece by a series of rapidly recurring current discharges between two electrodes, separated by a dielectric liquid and subject to an electric voltage. One of the electrodes is called the tool-electrode, or simply the “tool” or “electrode,” while the other is called the workpiece-electrode, or “workpiece.” The process depends upon the tool and workpiece not making actual contact.

EDM can be used to machine conductive materials of any hardness (for example steel or titanium) to an accuracy of up to one-thousandth of a millimeter with no mechanical action. By virtue of these properties, EDM is one of the key technologies in mold and tool making. There are two distinct processes — wire cut and die-sinking EDM machines.

Equipment